American Abolitionists and Antislavery Activists:
Conscience of the Nation

Updated February 14, 2017










l to r: Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Wendell Phillips




American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society (AFASS)


The American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society (AFASS) was founded in 1840.  It was formed after the model of the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, to which it already had ties.  Arthur Tappan was appointed its first President.  The AFASS was created following a difference of opinion within the American Anti-Slavery Society regarding female participation in the abolition movement, the role of churches and the political process in ending slavery.  The AFASS rejected participation in the political process and was opposed to traditional religious beliefs in regard to the abolition of slavery.  The Society published a newspaper, the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Reporter and abolitionist tracts written by Society president Lewis Tappan.  The AFASS was disbanded in 1855.  Other prominent members of the AFASS were Arthur Tappan, Samuel Cornish, and Theodore Wright.  (References)

  • Chapter by Henry Wilson, "Dissension among the Abolitionists. - Disruption of the American Antislavery Society," in Henry Wilson, History of the Rise and Fall of the Slave Power in America, 1872.
  • Officers, members and supporters of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society



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Chapter by Henry Wilson
, "Dissension among the Abolitionists. - Disruption of the American Antislavery Society," in Henry Wilson, History of the Rise and Fall of the Slave Power in America, 1872:

On that day the delegates assembled in great numbers in the city of New York. Arthur Tappan, president of the society, not being present, Francis Jackson of Boston, one of the vice-presidents, took the chair. Mrs. Lydia Maria Child was placed upon the business committee. Not being present, Lewis Tappan suggested that her place be supplied by her husband, David Lee Child. But Miss Abby Kelley being appointed in place of Mrs. Child, Mr. Tappan, Charles W. Denison, and Amos A. Phelps asked to be excused from serving on the committee. After a brief debate the sense of the meeting was taken, and the appointment of Miss Kelley was sustained by more than a hundred majority in favor of the rights of women to take part in the proceedings of the society.

In the evening a meeting was held at the house of Lewis Tappan, and it was unanimously agreed that a division was inevitable, and that a new society should be immediately organized. A committee was appointed of one from each State, of which Rev. David Thurston of Maine was chairman, to draft a constitution. During the forenoon of the next day, by permission of the presiding officer of the society, then in session, notice was given that a meeting of those opposed to its proceeding would be held in the afternoon in the basement of the church. To consider the expediency of forming a new society. When this meeting assembled, Mr. Tappan was made chairman. The proceedings of the preliminary meeting were stated, and a resolution was adopted declaring it expedient to form such a society. During the next two days a constitution was adopted, and a society of nearly three hundred members; from eleven States, was organized. It adopted as its name, The American and Foreign Antislavery Society. Arthur Tappan was chosen president, James G. Birney and Henry R Stanton secretaries, and Lewis Tappan treasurer. A large executive committee was appointed, of which the Tappans, Mr. Birney, Mr. Stanton, William Jackson, Whittier; Gerrit Smith, Judge Jay, Joshua Leavitt, Thomas Morris, William H. Brisbane, Edward Beecher, and many other prominent Abolitionists, were members.  

An address was soon afterward issued by the president of the new society, in which the disturbing elements in the old organization were referred to; and the causes of separation were distinctly stated. Among the reasons assigned for the separation were the action of the society concerning the admission of women to take part in its proceedings, and the non-resistant and no-government views of a portion of its members. The former it declared to be an innovation that seemed “repugnant to the constitution of the society," '' a firebrand in antislavery meetings,"' which was “contrary to the usages of the civilized world," and which “tended to destroy the efficiency of female antislavery action.'' Concerning the latter, it maintained that, though at its formation " the lawfulness of human government was recognized, and it was a fundamental principle that political action was both expedient and proper," the same persons who were contending for the civil and political equality of women with men " deny the obligation of forming, supporting, or yielding obedience to civil government, and refuse to affirm the duty of political action.  Avowing that the members of the new society recognized the “rightfulness of government," and "urge political action as a duty," it affirmed that it would not denounce those" as recreants " who might differ from them in regard to the " best modes of action “; and that, so far as their conduct could influence the future, the two divisions of antislavery men would henceforth plead the cause of the slave without criminating or recriminating each other. It declared that the purpose of the convention which originated the American and Foreign Antislavery Society was not to enforce uniformity of action, subject the widespread antislavery host to the decrees of one central power, follow the footsteps of any earthly leader, or glorify any man of like passions with themselves, but to labor for the speedy and peaceful triumph of liberty, and to give God all the glory. Commencing its career with these avowals of its spirit and purposes, and embracing within its ranks many men of large capacity and experience, it labored several years, and rendered service to the cause.

Lindley Coates of Pennsylvania was chosen president of the old society. The vacancies made by the retiring members were filled by men in harmony with the views of the majority. The " Antislavery Standard," with its motto, " Without concealment, without compromise," was established as its organ in the city of New York, under the editorial charge of Nathaniel P. Rogers of New Hampshire, one of their most brilliant and vigorous writers. The executive committee soon issued an address in reply to the address of the new society, in which the course of the old organization was vigorously defended, and the action of those who had seceded was sharply criticised. This society continued to advocate the cause of immediate emancipation, and to enunciate the distinctive doctrines of that section of Abolitionists which sustained the views of Mr. Garrison until slavery was abolished by the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution of the United States.

The disruption of the American Antislavery Society, and the formation of the American and Foreign Antislavery Society, excited much feeling among Abolitionists in certain localities, especially in the New England States. Mr. Goodell says of it: " While these divisions, produced a strong sensation in New England and in the seaboard cities, the sound of them going across the Atlantic and awakening kindred responses pro and con among the Abolitionists of Great Britain, the blast died away like a Massachusetts northeaster as-it travelled westward, spending its strength before it had reached the Valley of the Mohawk, and was scarcely felt beyond the waters of Lake Erie."

At the time of the separation there were probably two thousand societies in the country, containing, it was estimated, some two hundred thousand members. They had, however, already attained their maximum of numbers and influence, and had accomplished the largest share of their peculiar work. Afterward their numbers and distinctive labors were diminished, rather than increased. Various causes contributed to produce that result. Such societies had lost the charm of novelty which at first had attracted some to join their ranks. Many, too, had become disheartened by the growing magnitude of the evil and the increasing difficulties which revealed themselves in the way of its overthrow. Besides, antislavery ideas and principles were finding for themselves other modes of expression and action. While, therefore, these distinctive societies were declining in numbers and efficiency, the cause for which they were originally organized was making progress.

Nevertheless these organizations, with all their divisions, dissensions, and mistakes, rendered essential service. They were the pioneers in the great work of emancipation. They were the fore runners of this modern evangel of Liberty. They sounded the alarm which awoke the slumbering nation, to its dangers and its duties. They kindled and kept alive those fires of freedom that revealed more distinctly the darkening shadows which slavery was casting over the land. During the first few years of their active and arduous labors they did much to direct attention to the wrongs of the slave, the crimes of the slave system, and the dangers those wrongs and crimes involved. Though other and subsequent agencies were employed to render more available and practicable the principles of the great conflict, the honor of their first and brave proclamation will ever belong to them.

Source:  Wilson, Henry, History of the Rise and Fall of the Slave Power in America, Vol. 1.  Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1872, 419-422.




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Officers, Members and Supporters:

Tappan, Arthur, 1786-1865, New York City, merchant, radical abolitionist leader, educator.  Co-founder and president of the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS), December 1833.  Manager, 1833-1837, and Member of the Executive Committee, 1833-1840 of the AASS. President of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1855, Member of the Executive Committee, 1840-1855. 

(Dumond, 1961, p. 286; Filler, 1960, pp. 26, 40, 55, 58, 60-61, 63-64, 68, 84, 132, 262; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970, pp. 4, 8, 9, 14-18, 21, 38-41, 44, 48, 51, 55, 71, 107, 129, 134, 151, 152, 153, 200, 234, 235, 242, 285, 293, 340; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 1, 4, 7, 8, 13-14, 16-17; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 42, 106, 161, 162, 163, 166, 320, 362; Sorin, 1971, pp. 73, 75, 102, 114; Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. VI, p. 33; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 9, Pt. 2, p. 209; American Reformers: An H.W. Wilson Biographical Dictionary, New York, 1985; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 21, p. 311; The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. II. New York: James T. White, 1892, pp. 320-321; Tappan, Lewis. Life of Arthur Tappan. New York, Hurd and Houghton: 1870.)

 

Officers:

 

Aaron, Samuel, 1800-1865, Morristown, NJ, educator, clergyman, temperance activist, abolitionist.  Manager, American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS), 1840-1842.  Vice President, 1839-1840, Executive Committee, 1840-1843, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society. 

(Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. I, p. 1.  Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936)

 

Baldwin, Jesse G., Middletown, Connecticut, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1840-41.

 

Barbour, John N., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1853-55.

 

Beecher, Edward, 1803-1895, Jacksonville, Illinois, clergyman, abolitionist leader, writer, social reformer.  President, Illinois College, Jacksonville, Illinois.  Pastor, Salem Street Church, Boston.  Executive committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society.  Friend of abolitionist leader Elijah J. Lovejoy.  Co-founded Anti-Slavery Society in Illinois.  Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1842.  Son of abolitionist Lyman Beecher, brother of author Harriet Beecher Stowe, who was the author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Charles Beecher, and Henry Ward Beecher. 

(Dumond, 1961, pp. 153-154, 288; Merideth, 1968; Pease, 1965, pp. 268-272; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 40, 187-188; Rugoff, 1981; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. I, pp. 219-220; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 1, Pt. 2, p. 128)

 

Belden, Henry, New York, New York, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1852-55.

 

Beman, Amos G., 1812-1874, New Haven, Hartford, Connecticut, African American clergyman, abolitionist, speaker, temperance advocate, community leader.  Member of the American Anti-Slavery Society 1833-1840.  Later, founding member of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society.  Traveled extensively and lectured on abolition.  Leader, Negro Convention Movement.  Founder and first Secretary of Anti-Slavery Union Missionary Society.  Later organized as American Missionary Association (AMA), 1846.  Championed Black civil rights.  Promoted anti-slavery causes and African American civil rights causes, worked with Frederick Douglass and wrote for his newspaper, The North Star

(American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 2, p. 540; Gates, Henry Louis, Jr., & Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, eds. African American National Biography. Oxford University Press, 2013, Vol. 1, p. 463).

 

Beman, Jehiel C., c. 1789-1858, Connecticut, Boston, Massachusetts, African American, clergyman, abolitionist, temperance activist.  Manger, American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS), 1837-1839.  Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1841-1843.

(Gates, Henry Louis, Jr., & Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, eds. African American National Biography. Oxford University Press, 2013, Vol. 1, p. 477).

 

Benedict, Seth W., New York, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-1840, and publishing agent, American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS).  Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1851. (Yellin, 1994, p. 43n40).

 

Bird, Elijah, Tauton, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Birney, James G., 1792-1857, New York, New York, abolitionist leader, statesman, orator, writer, lawyer, jurist, newspaper publisher.  On two occasions, mobs in Cincinnati attacked and wrecked his newspaper office.  Beginning in 1832, Birney was an agent for the American Colonization Society, representing the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee.  In 1833, he transferred to agent in Kentucky.  Wrote pro-colonization articles for Alabama Democrat.  Editor of the Philanthropist, founded 1836.  Founder and president of the Liberty Party in 1848.  Third party presidential candidate, 1840, 1844.  Founder University of Alabama.  Native American rights advocate.  Member of the American Colonization Society.  American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1835-1836, Vice President, 1835-1836, 1836-1838, Executive Committee, 1838-1840, Corresponding Secretary, 1838-1840. American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Secretary, 1840-1841, Executive Committee, 1840-1842.  His writings include: “Ten Letters on Slavery and Colonization,” (1832-1833), “Addresses and Speeches,” (1835), “Vindication of the Abolitionists,” (1835), “The Philanthropist,” a weekly newspaper (1836-1837), “Address of Slaveholders,” (1836), “Argument on Fugitive Slave Case,” (1837), “Political Obligations of Abolitionists,” (1839), “American Churches the Bulwarks of American Slavery,” (1840), and “Speeches in England,” (1840). 

 

(Birney, 1969; Blue, 2005, pp. 20-21, 25, 30, 32, 48-51, 55, 9-99, 101, 139, 142, 163, 186, 217; Burin, 2005, pp. 84, 112; Drake, 1950, pp. 141, 149, 159; Dumond, 1938; Dumond, 1961, pp. 90, 93, 176, 179, 185, 197, 198, 200-202, 257-262, 286, 297, 300-301, 303; Filler, 1960, pp. 55, 73, 77, 89, 94, 107, 128, 131, 137, 140-141, 148, 152, 156, 176; Fladeland, 1955; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970, pp. 27, 36, 40, 41, 49, 54, 55, 60, 71, 92, 195, 228, 252,293, 301, 323, 328, 350; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 4-5, 7, 8, 13-15, 18, 21-31, 35, 50, 101, 199, 225; Pease, 1965, pp. 43-49; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 43-44, 46, 48, 163, 188-189, 364, 522; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25, 47, 51, 52, 65, 70n, 97, 103n; Staudenraus, P. J. The African Colonization Movement, 1816-1865. New York: Columbia University Press, 1961, pp. 146-148, 211-212, 229-230; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. I, pp. 267-269; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 1, Pt. 2, pp. 291-294; American Reformers: An H.W. Wilson Biographical Dictionary, New York, 1985, pp. 79-80; Birney, William, Jas. G. Birney and His Times, 1890; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 2; The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. II. New York: James T. White, 1892, pp. 312-313)

 

Bishop, Joshua, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Blakely, J. M., Poughkeepsie, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Blount, Nathan, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834, 1839)

 

Bonton, Nathaniel, New Hampshire, abolitionist, State Representative from New Hampshire, 1838 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Boice, Harper, Dalton, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Bobeson, Andrew, New Bedford, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Boutelle, Luther, Groton, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Bowen, B., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Bowers, H. C., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Bowers, J. C., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Boyee, James P., Lynn, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Brackett, Josiah, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1841-43.

 

Bradburn, George, Nantucket, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Bradley, Henry, Pen Yan, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Brayton, Nancy, L., Pawtucket, Rhode Island, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Brewster, William H., Derry, New Hampshire, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Brisbane, William H., 1803-1878, South Carolina, abolitionist leader.  Executive Committee of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1843.  Clergyman, Baptist Church in Madison, Wisconsin.  Chief Clerk of the Wisconsin State Senate.  He inherited slaves, however he realized slavery was wrong.  In 1835, Brisbane freed 33 of his slaves, bringing them to the North where he helped them settle.  As a result, he was criticized by his family and friends.  He moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he worked for the abolitionist cause.

(Dumond, 1961, pp. 93, 286; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. I, p. 378)

 

Bronson, Asa, Fall River, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Brooks, Hiram, Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Brown, John, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Brown, Michael R., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Browne, John W., Lynne, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Buckmaster, T. O., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Buffum, Arnold, 1782-1859, Smithfield, Rhode Island, Indiana, New York, New York, Society of Friends, Quaker, radical abolitionist, temperance reformer, philanthropist.  Maor of Lynn, Massachusetts.  Member, Massachusetts House of Representatives.  Co-founder (with William Lloyd Garrison) and first president of the New England Anti-Slavery Society, in 1832.  Manager and founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society in December 1833.  Manager, Massachusetts, 1833-1837; Manager, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1835-1837; Vice President, 1834-1836.  Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1846-1855.  Lectured extensively against slavery.  Visited England to promote abolitionism.  Was influenced by English anti-slavery leaders Clarkson and Wilberforce.

(Drake, 1950, pp. 137, 157-158, 162-163, 178; Pease, 1965, pp. 418-427; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 218, 401, 433; Staudenraus, 1961, pp. 195-198, 209-210; Van Broekhoven, 2002, pp. 18, 20, 22, 58, 62, 66, 67; Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; Buffum, Arnold, Lectures Showing the Necessity for a Liberty Party, and Setting Forth its Principles, Measures and Object, 1844; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. II, Pt. 1, p. 241; The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. II. New York: James T. White, 1892, p. 320).

 

Buffum, Hannah, Lynn, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Buffum, Jonathan, Lynn, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Buffum, S. W., Patterson, New Jersey, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Buffum, Sarah G., Fall River, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Burehard, S. D., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Burgess, Daniel, Hartford, Connecticut, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1840-41, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1841-43.

 

Burke, Able B., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Burleigh, Charles C., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Burley, W. A., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Burney, Eliza, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Bush, Charles P., Yale College, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Bushnell, Asa W., Livingston, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Butler, Daniel, Dorchester, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Chapin, Josiah, abolitionist, Providence, Rhode Island, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1840-43.

 

Chester, Elisha W., New York, New York, abolitionist.  American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1853-55.

 

Church, William, abolitionist, New York, New York, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1840-41.

 

Cleveland, John P., Marshall, Michigan, Executive Committee, 1840-43, abolitionist, Detroit, Michigan, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1837-40, Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1843.

 

Collins, William, abolitionist, New York, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1851-1852.

 

 

Cornish, Samuel E., Newark, New Jersey, Executive Committee, 1840-55.

 

Crosby, Josiah, abolitionist, Jaffrey, New Hampshire, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1841-43.

 

Crozier, Hiram F., abolitionist, New York, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1849-1851.

 

Culver, Erastus D., Brooklyn, New York, abolitionist leader.  Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society. (Sorin, 1971, p. 104).

 

Curtis, Jonathan, abolitionist, Pittsfield, New Hampshire, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1840-41.

 

Deming, Samuel, abolitionist, Farmington, Connecticut, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1840-43.

 

Eddy, John S., abolitionist, Providence, Rhode Island, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1840-43.

 

Eggleston, Nathaniel, abolitionist, Brooklyn, New York, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1853-52.

 

Everest, Asa, abolitionist, Brooklyn, New York, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1851-52.

 

Fairbanks, Dexter, abolitionist, New York, New York, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1841-42.

 

Finley, James B., abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1853-55.

 

Freeman, Amos N., abolitionist, Portland, Maine, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1853-55.

 

Gibbs, Leonard, abolitionist, New York, New York, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1841-46.

 

Graham, Daniel M., abolitionist, New York, New York, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1853-55.

 

Halstead, C. S., abolitionist, Brooklyn, New York, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Rec. Secretary, 1848-50.

 

Harned, William, abolitionist, New York, New York, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Rec. Secretary, 1846-47.

 

Hastings, Charles, abolitionist, Detroit, Michigan, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1839-43.

 

Hoyt, Daniel, abolitionist, Sandwich, New Hampshire, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1836-40

 

 

Jackson, William, 1783-1855, Newton, Massachusetts, newspaper publisher, abolitionist, temperance activist.  U.S. Congressman, Whig Party.  Vice president, 1833-1836, and founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society, December 1833.  Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1841.  Founding member, Liberty Party.  President of the American Missionary Society from 1846-1854.

(Dumond, 1961, p. 286; Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. III; Biographical Dictionary of the United States Congress; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 5, Pt. 1, p. 561)

 

Jay, William, 1789-1858, Bedford, NY, jurist, anti-slavery activist, abolitionist leader, anti-slavery Liberty Party. Son of first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, John Jay. In 1819, he strongly opposed the Missouri Compromise, which allowed the extension of slavery into the new territories. Drafted the constitution of the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS).  Corresponding Secretary, 1835-1838, Executive Committee, 1836-1837, AASS.  Executive Committee, 1840-41, Vice-President, 1849-55, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society (AFASS).  He was removed as a judge of Westchester County, in New York, due to his antislavery activities. Supported emancipation of slaves in the District of Columbia and the exclusion of slavery from new territories, although he did not advocate interfering with slave laws in the Southern states.

 

(Dumond, 1961, pp. 47, 159, 226, 286, 301; Mabee, 1970, pp. 73, 107, 199, 251, 253, 295; Sorin, 1971, pp. 51, 77-81, 96, 132; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. III; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 5, Pt. 2, p. 11; American Reformers: An H.W. Wilson Biographical Dictionary, New York, 1985, pp. 473-475; Jay, W., Life and Writings of John Jay, 1833; Jay, W., An Inquiry into the Character and Tendency of the American Colonization and American Anti-Slavery Societies, 1834; Jay, W., A View of the Action of the Federal Government in Behalf of Slavery, 1837; Jay, W., War and Peace, 1848; Jay, W., Review of the Causes and Consequences of the Mexican War, 1849).

 

 

Jocelyn, Simeon S., New Haven, Connecticut, New York, New York, abolitionist leader.  Vice President, 1834-1835, Manager and founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society, December 1833.  Member of the Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1855.  Co-founded the Amistad Committee.

(Dumond, 1961, pp. 169, 171, 175-176; Mabee, 1970, pp. 4, 30, 31, 150, 235, 396n5; Sorin, 1971; Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. II. New York: James T. White, 1892, p. 326).

 

Johnson, William, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1843-51.

 

Kirkland, William, Michigan, Executive Committee, 1843-46, abolitionist, Michigan, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1837-40.

 

Knapp, Chauncey L., Montpelier, Vermont, Executive Committee, 1843-46, abolitionist, Montpelier, Vermont, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1837-40, 1840-41.

 

Lansing, Dirck C., 1758-1857, New York, New York, clergyman, abolitionist.  Vice president, 1833-1835, and founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society, December 1833.  Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1851-1855. 

(Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. III, p. 615)

 

Leavitt, Joshua, 1794-1873, New York, New York, reformer, temperance activist, editor, lawyer, clergyman, abolitionist leader.  Active supporter of the American Colonization Society.  Helped in raising funds for the Society.  Founder of the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS), New York, 1833.  Manager, AASS, 1833-1837.  Executive Committee, AASS, 1834-1840.  Recording Secretary, AASS, 1838-1840.  Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society (A&FASS), 1840-1844, 1849-1855.  Advocated political action to end slavery, which led him to help found the Liberty Party.  Edited the newspaper, The Evangelist, which was founded by abolitionists Arthur and Lewis Tappan.  He later became editor of The Emancipator, which was founded by Arthur Tappan in 1833.  Leavitt toured extensively, lecturing against slavery.  His speeches were edited into a pamphlet entitled, “The Financial Power of Slavery.”  It was one of the most widely circulated documents against slavery. 

(Blue, 2005, pp. 20, 25, 34, 45, 50, 54, 94, 119, 122; Davis, 1990; Dumond, 1961, pp. 159, 175, 179, 266, 286, 301; Filler, 1960, pp. 24, 63, 101, 132, 142, 150, 168, 172, 174, 177, 189, 194, 266-267; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 1, 7-8, 17, 20, 28-30, 36, 45-49, 167, 217; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 42, 363-364; Sorin, 1971, pp. 51, 68-71, 96, 131, 132; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. III, pp. 649-650; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 6, Pt. 1, p. 84; American Reformers: An H.W. Wilson Biographical Dictionary, New York, 1985, pp. 518-519; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 13, p. 339; papers in the Library of Congress; Staudenraus, P. J. The African Colonization Movement, 1816-1865. New York: Columbia University Press, 1961, pp. 129-130, 214, 219)

 

Lee, Luther, 1800-1889, New York, New York, clergyman, Methodist congregation, Utica, New York, abolitionist leader.  Began his abolitionist career in 1837.  Helped create Wesleyan anti-slavery societies.  In 1843, co-founded the anti-slavery Wesleyan Methodist Connection of America, of which he became president.  Lecturer for New York Anti-Slavery Society (NYASS) and agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.  Member, Executive Committee of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1846-1852.  Luther was attacked on a number of occasions by pro-slavery advocates.  In 1840, Lee helped to co-found the Liberty Party. 

(Filler, 1960, p. 123; Sernett, 2002, pp. 57-58, 59, 80-83, 299n8, 300n16; Sorin, 1971; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. III, 603; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 6, Pt. 1, p. 115; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 13, p. 384)

 

Leeds, Samuel, New York, New York, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1850-51.

 

LeMoyne, Francis J., 1798-1879, Washington, Pennsylvania, physician, abolitionist leader.  Le Moyne became active in the abolitionist movement in the 1830s.  Was against the colonization movement.  Le Moyne was a manager in the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS), 1837-1840, 1840-1841.  Vice President of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1851.   In 1840, ran as the vice presidential candidate of the Liberty Party.  Also unsuccessfully ran on Pennsylvania abolitionist tickets, 1841, 1844, 1847.  Was active in helping fugitive slaves in the Underground Railroad.  Founded Le Moyne College in 1870 in Memphis, Tennessee. 

(Blue, 2005, p. 25; Dumond, 1961, pp. 186, 266, 301; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 46; Sernett, 2002, pp. 109, 111; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. III, p. 687; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 6, Pt. 1, p. 163)

 

Lillie, William, New York, New York, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1844-1851.

 

McCormick, Richard S., New York, New York, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1841-1842.

 

MacDonald, Alexander, New York, New York, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1849-1855.

 

Morris, Thomas, 1776-1844, Cincinnati, Ohio, Virginia, first abolitionist Senator, 1833, vice president of the Liberty Party, abolitionist, Ohio lawmaker 1806-1830, Chief Justice of the State of Ohio 1830-1833, U.S. Senator 1833-183?.  Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society (A&FASS), 1840-1844.  Vice President of the American Colonization Society (ACS), 1839-1841.  Fought for right to petition Congress against slavery. 

(Dumond, 1961, pp. 92, 135, 243, 244, 286, 300; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 11, 18, 23-24, 27; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 48; Staudenraus, P. J. The African Colonization Movement, 1816-1865. New York: Columbia University Press, 1961; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 15, p. 916; Appleton’s Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. IV, p. 418; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 7, Pt. 1, p. 226)

 

Nelson, David, Quincy, Illinois, abolitionist.  American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS), American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society (AFASS).

 

Newton, Calvin, Thomaston, Maine, Waterville College, Maine, abolitionist.  Manager, 1833-1840, and founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society, December 1833.  Member, Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society (AFASS), 1840-1844. 

(Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833).

 

Norton, John T., Farmington, Connecticut, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Vice-President, 1838-1840, 1840-1841.  Vice President, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society (AFASS), 1840-1841.

 

Parker, Charles, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1851-1852.

 

Payne, John A., Newark, New Jersey, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1842-1844.

 

Pennington, James W., 1807-1870, African American, American Missionary Association, fugitive slave, abolitionist, orator, clergyman.  Member of the Executive Committee of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1848-55.  Published The Fugitive Blacksmith in London in 1844.  One of the first African American students to attend Yale University. Served as a delegate to the Second World Conference on Slavery in London.  Active in the Amistad slave case.  Recruited African American troops for the Union Army. 

(Dumond, 1961, pp. 330-334; Mabee, 1970, pp. 65, 100, 101, 140, 194, 203, 269, 338, 339, 413n1; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 52, 73, 166, 413-414; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 7, Pt. 2, p. 441; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 17, p. 300).

 

Perkins, Jared, Unity, New Hampshire, Nashua, New Hampshire, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1839-1840.  Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1841.

 

Phelps, Amos A., 1805-1847, Boston, Massachusetts, clergyman, editor. Manager and founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS), December 1833; Manager, 1834-1835, Vice-President, 1834-1835, Executive Committee, 1836-1838, Recording Secretary, 1836-1840.  American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1844-47, Corresponding Secretary, 1845-47.  Editor, Emancipation and The National Era. Husband of abolitionist Charlotte Phelps.

(Dumond, 1961, pp. 182, 185, 266, 276, 285; Pease, 1965, pp. 71-85; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 290; Yellin, 1994, pp. 47, 54, 54n, 59-60, 125; Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. IV, p. 751; Phelps, “Lectures on Slavery and its Remedy,” Boston, 1834; Staudenraus, P. J. The African Colonization Movement, 1816-1865. New York: Columbia University Press, 1961, pp. 132, 228-229)

 

Phoenix, Samuel F., Wisconsin, Territory, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1835-1837.

 

Post, Albert L., Montrose, Pennsylvania, Executive Committee, 1840-44, Montrose, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1840-1841.  Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1844.

 

Putnam, George, Boston, Massachusetts, Executive Committee, 1840-41, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1840-1841.

 

Ray, Charles B., 1807-1886, New York, New York, African American, journalist, educator, clergyman, abolitionist leader.  American Missionary Association (AMA).  Newspaper owner and editor, The Colored American.  African American.  Member of the anti-slavery Liberty Party.  Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society (AFAAS), 1847-1851, 1853-1855, Recording Secretary, 1849-1855.  One of the first African Americans to participate in abolitionist party on a national level.  Member and activist with the Underground Railroad.  Co-founder and director, New York Vigilance Committee, which aided and protected fugitive slaves.  Member of the American Anti-Slavery Society.

 

(Blue, 2005, p. 98; Dumond, 1961, pp. 268, 330, 333; Mabee, 1970, pp. 58, 59, 62, 95-97, 111, 134, 146, 181, 338, 339, 415n14; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 48, 166; Sernett, 2002, pp. 64, 116, 132, 199, 201; Sorin, 1971, pp. 93-94; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 8, Pt. 1, p. 403; Annals of Congress; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 18, p. 201; Gates, Henry Louis, Jr., & Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, eds. African American National Biography. Oxford University Press, 2013, Vol. 9, p. 353).

 

 

Ritter, Thomas, New York, New York, abolitionist, American Abolition Society, Executive Committee, 1855-1856.  Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1848-1855.

 

Rush, Christopher, New York, New York, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1834-1837.  Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1841-1851.

 

Safford, Nathaniel, New York, New York, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1841-1842, Member, 1840-1848.

 

Scott, Orange, 1800-1847, Springfield, Massachusetts, Newark, New Jersey, Methodist clergyman, anti-slavery agent, abolitionist leader.  Member of Congress from Pennsylvania.  Entered anti-slavery cause in 1834.  Lectured in New England.  In 1839, founded and published the American Wesleyan Observer, an anti-slavery publication.  Withdrew from Methodist Church to co-found the Wesleyan Methodist Church in 1843 with Jotham Horton.  Manager of the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS), 1838-1840, Executive Committee, 1847-1851, 1853-1855, Recording Secretary 1849-1855.  American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1840-1848. 

(Dumond, 1961, pp. 187, 285, 349; Locke, 1901, pp. 93, 140; Mabee, 1970, pp. 46, 228-229; Matlack, 1849, p. 162; Annals of Congress; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. V, p. 438; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 8, Pt. 2, p. 497; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 19, p. 503; The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. II. New York: James T. White, 1892, p. 315).

 

Shotwell, William, New York, New York, abolitionist.  American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Treasurer, 1841-46, Executive Committee, 1846-47.

 

Smith, Gerrit, 1797-1874, Peterboro, New York, large landowner, reformer, philanthropist, radical abolitionist.  Supporter of the American Colonization Society (ACS).  Served as a Vice President of the ACS, 1833-1836.  Also supported the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS).  Served as a Vice President of the AASS, 1836-1840, 1840-1841.  Vice President of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1844.  Active in the Underground Railroad.  Member of the Liberty Party.  Member of the Pennsylvania Free Produce Association.  Secretly supported radical abolitionist John Brown. 

(Blue, 2005, pp. 19, 20, 25, 26, 32-36, 50, 53, 54, 68, 101, 102, 105, 112, 132, 170; Dumond, 1961, pp. 200, 221, 231, 295, 301, 339, 352; Filler, 1960; Friedman, 1982; Frothingham, 1876; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970, pp. 37, 47, 55, 56, 71, 72, 104, 106, 131, 135, 150, 154, 156, 187-189, 195, 202, 204, 219, 220, 226, 227, 237, 239, 246, 252, 253, 258, 307, 308, 315, 320, 321, 327, 342, 346; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 5, 8, 13, 16, 22, 29, 31, 36, 112, 117-121, 137, 163, 167, 199, 224-225, 243; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 46, 50, 51, 56, 138, 163, 206, 207, 327, 338, 452-454; Sernett, 2002, pp. 22, 36, 49-55, 122-126, 129-132, 143-146, 169, 171, 173-174, 205-206, 208-217, 219-230; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25-38, 47, 49, 52, 66, 95, 96, 102, 126, 130; Staudenraus, P. J. The African Colonization Movement, 1816-1865. New York: Columbia University Press, 1961, pp. 128, 129, 165, 189-190, 201, 213, 221, 224, 225, 230-231; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. V, pp. 583-584; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 9, Pt. 1, p. 270; American Reformers: An H.W. Wilson Biographical Dictionary, New York, 1985; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 20; The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. II. New York: James T. White, 1892, pp. 322-323; Harlow, Ralph Volney. Gerrit Smith: Philanthropist and Reformer. New York: Holt, 1939.)

 

Smith, James M., 1813-1865, New York, New York, African American, abolitionist leader, community leader, activist.  James McCune Smith was the first African American to receive a medical degree.  He was also the first African American to operate a pharmacy in the U.S.  He was a leader in the abolitionist American Anti-Slavery Society.  In 1853, he helped organize the National Council of Colored People, with Frederick Douglass.  In addition, he co-organized the Committee of Thirteen, in New York City, to aid escaped slaves through the Underground Railroad after the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act.  Recording Secretary, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1852-1855. 

(Dumond, 1961, pp. 268, 333; Mabee, 1970, p. 134; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 454; Smith, James McCune, The Destiny of the People of Color, 1841; Smith, James McCune, A Lecture on the Haitian Revolution, 1841; Sorin, 1971, p. 82; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 9, Pt. 1, p. 288; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 20, p. 216; Congressional Globe; Gates, Henry Louis, Jr., & Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, eds. African American National Biography. Oxford University Press, 2013, Vol. 10, p. 345; Hinks, Peter P., & John R. McKivigan, Eds., Encyclopedia of Antislavery and Abolition.  Westport, Connecticut, Greenwood, 2007, Vol. 2, pp. 639-641)

 

Smyth, William, Brunswick, Maine, Executive Committee, 1840-44, Brunswick, Maine, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1835-1837.

 

Sperry, Croyden S., Brooklyn, New York, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Rec. Secretary, 1847-48.

 

Stanton, Henry B., 1805-1887, New York, New York, Cincinnati, Ohio, abolitionist leader, anti-slavery agent, journalist, author.  Worked with William T. Allan and Birney.  Financial Secretary of the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS), Manager, 1834-1838, Corresponding Secretary, 1838-1840, and Executive Committee of the Society, 1838.  Secretary, 1840-1841, and Member of the Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1844.  Leader of the Liberty Party.  Wrote for abolitionist newspapers.  Worked against pro-slavery legislation at state level.  Later edited the New York Sun

(Dumond, 1961, pp. 164, 219, 238-240, 286; Filler, 1960, pp. 68, 72, 134, 137, 156, 189, 301; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 4, 5, 7, 8, 12, 14016, 18, 28, 36, 45, 47, 101, 162, 223; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 162; Sorin, 1971 p. 63-67, 97, 131, 132; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. V, pp. 649-650; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 9, Pt. 1, p. 525).

 

Stewart, Alvan, 1790-1849, Utica, New York, reformer, educator, lawyer, abolitionist leader, temperance activist.  Member, American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS).  Vice President, 1834-1835, and Manager, 1837-1840, AASS.  Member of the Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1844-149.  Founder, leader, Liberty Party.  Founder, New York State Anti-Slavery Society (NYSASS), 1835. 

(Blue, 2005, pp. xiii, 4-5, 9, 13, 15-36, 49, 50, 63, 68, 92-94, 98, 145, 266; Dumond, 1961, pp. 225-226, 293-295, 300; Filler, 1960, pp. 151, 177; Mabee, 1970, pp. 4, 39, 40, 41, 246, 293; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 4-5, 9, 13, 15-36, 49, 50, 63, 92, 98; Sernett, 2002, pp. 49, 52, 73, 112, 122; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25, 32, 33, 47-52, 60, 103n, 115, 132; Zilversmit, 1967, pp. 218-220; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. V, p. 683; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 9, Pt. 2, p. 5; American Reformers: An H.W. Wilson Biographical Dictionary, New York, 1985, pp. 768-769; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 20, p. 742)

 

Storrs, George, Montpelier, Vermont, Executive Committee, 1840-41, New Hampshire, Montpelier, Vermont, Methodist clergyman, anti-slavery agent, abolitionist.  Member of the New Hampshire Conference, which founded an anti-slavery group in 1835.  Storrs was a Manager, 1835-1836, and a Vice President 1835-1837, of the American Anti-Slavery Society and a Member of the Executive Committee of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1841.  He was censured by the Methodist Church for his anti-slavery activities in 1836.  He was also arrested by authorities for “disturbing the peace.”  (Dumond, 1961, pp. 187, 245, 392n19)

 

Sunderland, LaRoy, 1804-1885, Andover, Massachusetts, and New York, New York, author, orator, abolitionist.  Manager, 1833-1836, 1836-1837, and founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society, December 1833.  Sunderland was a member of the Executive Committee of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1841.  Co-founder of Wesleyan Methodist Church.

(Dumond, 1961, pp. 187, 349; Matlack, 1849, p. 162; Pease, 1965, pp. 280-297, 439-445; Sorin, 1971; Yellin, 1994, p. 43n; Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. VI, p. 1; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 9, Pt. 2, p. 222; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 21, p. 153)

 

Tappan, Lewis, 1788-1873, New York, New York, merchant, radical abolitionist leader.  Co-founder of the American Anti-Slavery Society, December 1833.  Member of the Executive Committee of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1855, Treasurer, 1840-1842, Secretary, 1842-1844, Corresponding Secretary, 1845-1846, 1848-1855.  Leader of the Philadelphia Free Produce Association.  Wrote Life.

 

(Blue, 2005; Burin, 2005, p. 89; Dumond, 1961, pp. 159, 218, 287; Filler, 1960, pp. 26, 31, 50, 55, 61, 63, 68, 72, 94, 102, 130, 136, 138, 144, 150, 152, 158, 164, 165, 168, 174, 177, 189, 194, 210, 247, 262; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970, pp. 8, 9, 13-19, 21, 24, 26, 38, 42-49, 51, 55, 58, 91, 93, 104, 105, 130, 190, 151-156, 190, 202, 219-221, 226-229, 233, 234, 251-253, 257, 334, 340, 341, 343, 344, 345; Mitchell, 2007; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 42, 106, 161, 162, 163, 166, 174, 290, 362; Sorin, 1971, pp. 70, 93, 96, 102, 113, 114, 131; Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. VI, pp. 32-34; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 9, Pt. 2, p. 203; American Reformers: An H.W. Wilson Biographical Dictionary; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 21, p. 311; The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. II. New York: James T. White, 1892, p. 321; Tappan, Lewis. Life of Arthur Tappan. New York, Hurd and Houghton: 1870; Hinks, Peter P., & John R. McKivigan, Eds., Encyclopedia of Antislavery and Abolition.  Westport, Connecticut, Greenwood, 2007, Vol. 2, pp. 673-675; Wyatt-Brown, Bertram, Lewis Tappan and the Evangelical War against Slavery, 1969; Staudenraus, P. J. The African Colonization Movement, 1816-1865. New York: Columbia University Press, 1961, pp. 76, 128-129, 219, 228, 230)

 

 

Twining, William, Madison, Indiana, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1837-1840.

 

Warner, James, Brooklyn, New York, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1844-1855.

 

 

Waters, Henry, abolitionist.  American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1853-55.

 

Whipple, George, New York, New York, Executive Committee, 1846-55, Oberlin, Ohio, New York, abolitionist, clergyman, educator.  Secretary of the anti-slavery American Missionary Association (AMA).  American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1839-1840.  American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1844-1855, Treasurer, 1846-1855.  Teacher at Lane University.  Professor and principal, Oberlin College.  Worked in Freeman’s Bureau after the Civil War.  Agent of the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS). 

(Dumond, 1961, pp. 163, 165, 185; Mabee, 1970, pp. 153, 235, 403n25; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 166).

 

Whiting, William E., New York, New York, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1844-55, Treasurer, 1846-55.

 

Whittier, John G.,  1807-1892, Haverhill, Massachusetts, poet, journalist, newspaper publisher and editor, Society of Friends, Quaker, radical abolitionist.  Wrote antislavery poetry.  Publisher and editor of the Pennsylvania Freeman.  Founding member, Manager, and Secretary of the American Anti-Slavery Society.  Member of the Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society.  Leader and active with the Liberty Party.  Member, Free Soil Party.  Called for immediate abolition of slavery in the United States. 

(Blue, 2005, pp. 5, 37-64; Drake, 1950, pp. 113, 127, 137, 140-142, 158-159, 176, 181, 195; Dumond, 1961, pp. 167, 245, 286, 301; Filler, 1960, pp. 56, 66, 90, 105, 134, 148, 151, 194; Mabee, 1970, pp. 2, 4, 9, 11-13, 18, 21-22, 25-26, 29-30, 35-36, 48, 51, 65, 194, 211, 309, 326, 329, 359, 368, 373, 378; Pease, 1965, pp. 65, 102-104, 123-128; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 161, 433, 641, 723; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. VI, pp. 493-494; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 10, Pt. 2, p. 173; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 23, p. 350; The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. I. New York: James T. White, 1892, p. 407)

 

Wilde, Samuel, New York, New York, Executive Committee, 1846-49, Brooklyn, New York, abolitionist, American Abolition Society, Executive Committee, 1855-59.

 

Williams, Austin F., Farmington, Connecticut, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1848-51.

 

Williams, Ransom, New York, New York, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1844-1849.

 

Williston, John P., Northampton, Massachusetts, abolitionist, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, 1841-1844.

 

Wright, Theodore S., New York, New York, Executive Committee, 1843-47, 1797-1847, African American, New York, clergyman, abolitionist leader, orator.  American Missionary Association (AMA).  Manager, 1834-1840, and Member of the Executive Committee, 1834-1840, of the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS).  Executive Committee of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1843-1847.  

(Dumond, 1961, p. 330; Mabee, 1970, pp. 29, 51, 58, 59, 61, 62, 91, 105-106, 115, 129, 130, 150, 188, 226, 276, 285; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 47, 166, 305-306; Sorin, 1971, pp. 81-85, 90-92, 97; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 24, p. 62; Gates, Henry Louis, Jr., & Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, eds. African American National Biography. Oxford University Press, 2013, Vol. 12, p. 320).

 

Corresponding Secretaries:

 

Ackersduke, Professor, Utrect, Holland, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Alexander, George William, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Anderson, W. W., Esq., Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Bowley, Samuel, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Carlile, James D. D., Reverend, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Carové, Frankfort, Dr., Germany, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Chase, Salmon Portland, Ohio, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Cleveland, C. D., Pennsylvania, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Collins, J. H., Esq., Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

D’Instant, M., Haiti, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Galloway, John, Reverend, New Brunswick, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Goodell, William, New York, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Harvey, Thomas, Esq., Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Hinton, J. Howard, Reverend, England, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Isambert, M., Paris, France, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Jones, Thomas, Esq., Barbadoes, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Perkins, G. W., Reverend, Connecticut, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Scoble, John, Esq., Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Stevens, S. C., Hon., Indiana, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Sturge, Joseph, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Whittier, John Greenleaf, Massachusetts, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Willis, Revrend Dr., Toronto, Canada, Corresponding Secretary (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Members:

 

Belden, H., Reverend (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Colver, Reverend, Boston, Massachusetts (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Downing, George (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Everett, A. E., Reverend, pastor of the colored church in Prince Street, Brooklyn, New York. (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Howe, Mr., New Jersey (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Kellogg, H. H., Reverend, Oneida Co., New York, abolitionist (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)

 

Trask, Reverend, Massachusetts (American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)




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References


(Filler, 1960, pp. 136, 261; Harrold, 1995, pp. 7, 32, 87, 89, 91, 96, 104, 140-141, 144, 157; Mabee, 1970, pp. 4, 26, 56, 104, 106, 139, 156, 187, 203, 233, 246, 253, 255, 259, 274, 297, 307; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 16-17, 223, 237; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 46, 50, 179, 185, 308, 362, 398; Sorin, 1971, p. 131; Wilson, 1872, pp. 419-422; American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society Annual Reports)